Posts Tagged ‘Nina’

Being Human: Horrible Nora (Spoilers BBC, SYFY)

I suppose I should thank the writers on the Syfy version.  I’ve been struggling to separate Nora’s character from the one on BBC whom she’s ever so loosely based on, Nina.  The connection has been severed, because Nina is fantastic and Nora is simply awful.  It is suddenly hard to imagine that Josh can’t do better.

For the unlucky fans who don’t know, Nina is a little spitfire who fell in love with George in the very first season, worried about him losing his humanity and tried to convince him to embrace it in the second, and then returned to his side to make a family with him in the third.  She is the great love of George’s life and apart or together, she always had his back.

On the BBC, the women lift the men up, but on Syfy (with the seeming exception of Sally), they can’t stop dragging them down.  Since Nora became a werewolf, she’s enjoying her furry self much more than the human one.  This makes her detrimental to everything Josh and Aidan (and, off on her own, Sally) are trying to do.  The idea seems to be that someone who was once vulnerable enough to be abused by her boyfriend to the point of being viciously burned would prefer some access to power and even a separation from her own humanity, as if she equivocates her humanity with weakness.

The show implies that unlike Josh, who is completely separate from his wolf side for most of the month while he is human, Nora is ruled by wolf instincts, which cause her to jump to the defense of the two strangers who happen to share their condition.  Though she was quick enough to make Josh feel guilty about attacking her ex the previous week, she now admits that she finds Josh’s intent to have the werewolf pair murdered attractive—even as it threatens her suddenly sacred “pack”.

While Nora goes native, Josh continues to love and protect her, which ends up threatening Aidan’s life  and ending vampire cop, Cecelia’s.  Annoying (if sexy) sociopath Connor, the brother-werewolf who started all the trouble for Josh and Nora, finally gets got and his corpse conveniently takes the blame for the vampire murder that Nora committed.

You had to feel sorry for Brynn, who clearly never meant to cause trouble by approaching the two new werewolves with her different ideals.  But how irritating was Nora, who holds and comforts her new best pal, easily trading her loving boyfriend for what is now a pack of two?  Will Nora ever rediscover the urge to be human?  If so, can it be written in a way that will make her likable again?

Right now, that feels like a stretch.  Nina once left George because he participated in covering up a vampire murder.  Neither Nina nor George ever left the other because he or she didn’t want to stay wolves and eat people with impunity.  Considering the focus of the show, it puts Nora very firmly in the “Do Not Want” category for Josh.  At this point, she’s as damning to him as Suren is for Aidan.  Judging by the BBC, that’s not the way their relationship was supposed to go down.

Touching base with the other two roommates:

While it was fun the previous week to watch Aidan hallucinate my favorite vamp, Bishop, it was even more satisfying to watch the two roommates actually interact with each other this week, with Josh forcing Aidan deeper into the vampire conspiracy but both Josh and Aidan ultimately choosing their friendship over the werewolf/vampire politics that would tear them apart.

Sally looks as though she might not fight the Reaper after all.  She had a very brief confrontation with now-dead murderer, Danny (giving me immediate fantasies about the possibility of a similar circumstance for Annie and the diabolical Owen—how about it, Whithouse?!), and was saved by the Reaper.  She then admits she feels left behind by her roommates and is looking to move on.  She looks tempted to tell at least Aidan about this decision, but both Aidan and Josh are too busy to realize anything is amiss.  Too bad she was too busy last season to bond with them properly…surely they’d pay more attention then.

What’s to come?  It’s hard to say, being well away from most of the BBC second season plotlines.  All I know is how sorry I feel for Josh:  the person he fell for no longer exists.

Being Human: “Addicted to Love” (Syfy, BBC Spoilers)

Oh, Nora.  Girl.  What are you doing??

Last night’s episode is still careening off into no-man’s land, as far as nothing that we BBC fans have seen before.

There’s a flashback of Princess Suren’s temper tantrum, which didn’t seem impressive enough to warrant her punishment.  Granted, she killed in a public place, forcing Mother and the other vampires to mass murder the rest of the human witnesses.  I suppose this is the same as BBC:  the old ones wanted to force Mitchell underground for drawing too much attention to himself with his own mass murders, but he was able to refuse their offer.  For a time, at least.

Sally gets stuck possessing her living crush’s girlfriend until she’s driven out by the Reaper.  I notice many viewers are wondering why the Reaper is after her in the first place, which is made clearer on the BBC.  Instead of a ghostly figure, the BBC Reaper takes the form of Annie bleeding on the floor where she died, but thereafter uses the ability to communicate through radio or television…which is extremely creepy, but at least it’s verbal.  Annie is targeted because she turned down death and pissed off the powers that be…powers that are never explicitly defined.  As punishment, they try to drag her into hell in a variety of ways, and she has to learn how to fight death.  I can’t say if this will be the same for Sally—Syfy has the luxury of more episodes in a season, and therefore can take their time with the reveal.

We also get to meet the psycho ex who burned Nora, and see him get some richly deserved if brutal justice.  Nina’s ex never made an appearance, though she had the same story and the same vicious burns.  There is a pilot episode where the original George confronted his ex-fiance’s new abusive boyfriend with a violent reaction like Josh’s,  but no such episode where Nina does anything remotely similar.

Nora is not Nina.  That has to be my new mantra; they are nothing alike.  Nina never killed, and in fact was the one spending the second season searching for a cure.  Therefore, I can find little insight to Nora within Nina.  Nora seems to love Josh, but her wolf loves murder and mayhem—both represented in this new werewolf, Connor.  Josh/Nora fans like myself have reason to worry…Nina and George did part ways in the second season.  Nina refused to be sucked into George’s acceptance of the murder and chaos that surround the three roommates.  It’s possible that Nora and Josh will part on the opposite basis.

I’m looking forward to next week for one reason, and if you’re with me from last season, you know exactly what it is:

Herrick flashbacks on the BBC all involved actual memories, and I found it odd that Bishop wasn’t around for Aidan’s Suren background.  You might say I’ve missed him.  I can’t wait to get his take on the new order.  I bet he finds Mother and Suren as tedious as I do.

He Gets…A Letter.

I love him.  I really do.  I mean sickening…stomach-turning love…practicing my signature with his second name kind of love.  But I look at him, and I want to pull chunks of flesh from his face.

Being Human: “(ILoathe You) For Sentimental Reasons” (Spoilers Syfy, BBC)

Still digging through Syfy in my search for similarities to BBC, which should be waning as time goes by.  They can still be found if you’re willing to stretch for examples.

Sally attempts to help her living friend Zoe find a date, which is somewhat like when Annie attempts to help Hugh reconnect with his ex-girlfriend.  Hugh is one of those everlastingly nice guys who never get the girl, in love with Annie without realizing she’s a ghost.  Seemingly as a consequence of escaping the plot of the afterlife to suck her beyond the door, Annie becomes invisible to him but tries to help him find a more practical and appropriate love interest.

Zoe’s situation is the opposite, as by the end of the episode she prefers to date a ghost than a living human being.  Sally goes back to inhabiting a woman in order to get physical with the doctor she finds attractive.  Here, Syfy introduces an interesting addiction problem similar to Aidan’s.  Sally is the one who attends a support group of ghosts, whereas in the BBC version it is Mitchell who institutes a kind of Vampire AA—or would that be BA?  Of the two, the ghost support group is a bit easier to accept as a concept, since it’s hard to imagine the savagely blood-thirsty Being Human-style vampires sitting around expressing feelings.

Speaking of vampires, this week featured the return of boring, serious Suren with her ever-monotone voice.  I can’t help but wish she was played by Lucy Liu, who can deliver a line with the straightest face and still manage to inflect both humor and attitude.  If not, maybe the character needs some livening up through the writing.  I know what they’re trying to sell, I’m just not buying it.  The rebellious child of presumably the oldest and most powerful vampire in existence should be a lot more impressive.  I miss Bishop.

Aidan fights against dealing with the mafia, which is like Mitchell’s reluctance when dealing with dirty politician Chief Constable Wilson  in order to protect the vampires in Herrick’s stead.  Herrick”s progeny continued to kill teens and couples with impunity, forcing Mitchell to compromise his ideals in order to clean up after them.  Similarly, the mob man catches a rogue vampire as an act of good faith and to convince Aidan that his aid is necessary.  Aidan killed the mafia man because he succumbs to his blood addiction and his jealousy for Suren (unwarranted, if you ask me—what’s so great about her?).  Mitchell kills Wilson in much the same way, minus the sexual aspect.

In the BBC version, there is no brother/sister pair of natural born werewolves.  There IS a werewolf father/son duo claiming to be born werewolves in the third season, but their claim turns out to be false.  In the BBC version there is only one example of a natural born werewolf, and that’s Nina and George’s baby.  I do think the fact that it has never happened before adds a lot of drama and angst that Syfy will miss out on, and I did not fall in love with the idea that the resulting werewolves would prefer not to be human at all.  Should Nora and Josh follow that path, I guess their baby would be like that as well?  That seems to defeat the purpose of the show.

On Syfy, the three roommates continue to lead mostly separate lives.  This was also the case in the second season of the BBC version, but they’d already had a solid foundation built the first season.  There are a lot of satisfyingly dramatic scenes between them that can’t realistically occur without that closeness, such as George trying to break down a door to save Annie or Mitchell going psychotically savage to save them all.  I can’t see Aidan, Josh, or Sally getting that roused about each other.  Each one does fine without the others, and to me that’s a pity.

Those who worry about the future of certain main characters based on what happened in the last few episodes on BBC should rest easy—Syfy has no intention of letting them go that soon.  Maybe that’s why the characters can take their sweet time becoming close to each other.

Syfy’s Being Human: Do You Really Want to Hurt Me? (Spoilers Syfy, BBC)

Two episodes in and I’m having a much better time than last season.  Admittedly this could be because I found more fault with the BBC’s second season than I did with the first.  Syfy has a lot of opportunities to improve upon it.

I mentioned last week that George was kind of useless for Nina.  Like when he finally faces the fact that he changed her, it’s Nina who comforts him while he cries.  Every time I see that scene I want to reach into the screen and shake him.

Anyone who watched Syfy tonight saw Josh contain his own guilt as he attempts to convince Nora to survive this.  Two things in George’s defense:  First, Josh’s circumstances allow his mind to be more stable; he never killed, is not being constantly attacked by vampires, and has not given more ground in his head to the wolf.  Second, Nina is far stronger than Nora…heck, Nina is a lot stronger than George.  That’s why they complement each other so well.

I’ve decided the best thing to do is to stop expecting Nora to behave like Nina and accept her as a completely different character.  That’s why now I kind of like her.  I suppose she doesn’t need to turn any of that blame Aidan’s way as Nina did with Mitchell.  Mitchell is the one who encouraged George to date Nina, going so far as to invite her over for their first date.

Nina:  You loaded a gun and you fired it into a crowd.

My feelings for Sally are, per usual, slightly more mixed.  It’s good to see that she had some bonding moments with both roommates that didn’t involve whining and I was thrilled to see that she called for Aidan for help after her nightmare.  In the BBC version, Mitchell and Annie had already had some “moments” in season one that never happened for Sally and Aidan, so I was wondering if they were going to scrap the connection between them.  Maybe not!  🙂

Another Syfy plus is Sally’s ability to enter the bodies of humans.  I thought Meaghan Rath did a great job portraying something anyone could imagine:  the ultimate high, for a ghost to really be human again.  In the BBC second season, Annie is also testing her powers but the best she can do is touch the human and feel what that person experiences.  One finds out in Season 3 why that’s just not as good…

At this point, I can’t tell if Aidan’s storyline will resemble Mitchell’s second season at all.  True, the young woman that Aidan met at the hospital could be the human who was Mitchell’s love interest for a time, but she didn’t get the job and this episode ends with them leaving the bar together.  If he is hunting her, then she’s not the love interest.  That woman sticks around.

BBC has no Mother, nor Mother’s Daughter, Suren, but perhaps Suren is supposed to replace gorgeous, psychotic vampiress Daisy?  If so, Suren should step up her game because in comparison she’s completely dull.  I’m just not thrilled with all the cliche vampire posturing from her character.  Daisy was all about having fun:

“A lot of vampires, it’s all about the blood and the world domination. Me and Ivan… we’re just about the tourism.”

Daisy’s story was completely different from Suren’s, but she was the most important female vampire of Season 2.  She influenced Mitchell and even George, to some extent. But this wouldn’t be the first time I thought they were replacing a main character from the BBC’s version, only to see that character show up later in the season.  Syfy has more episodes, so they’ve got plenty of time.

SyFy’s Being Human Season 2: Off the BBC Track (SPOILERS BBC & Syfy)

Here we are again:  another series and another chance to play Syfy versus BBC.  At the end of season 1, I speculated that there were enough differences between the two that perhaps Syfy would be branching off in its own unique direction.  One episode in and it definitely still looks that way.  Just to be clear, I intend to spoil the ending of both BBC and Syfy’s first seasons, and the BBC second season.  If you didn’t see either of those endings, don’t go forward—you’re supposed to be surprised.  🙂

Let’s start with the end of last season, which is important in order to understand some big differences that exist before the second season even begins.  If you don’t recall and you missed the replay tonight, let me remind you that Sally tries to torture Josh via bitching and moaning so that he’ll use his wolf to kill Bishop for Aidan, since all three friends are veritably certain that Aidan will lose the fight.  Josh reluctantly agrees, but then Sally and Aidan turn the tables on him in order to protect him from having to kill.

That was a huge surprise for BBC fans, which was great because I thought I could only be surprised the first time around.  In ours, George pretends he intends to run away with Nina, when in fact he tricks Herrick into being locked in with his wolf.  He changes and tears Herrick to shreds.   The American version does offer a more satisfying fight, as the BBC focuses on a battle of words and the fight itself is a few blurry moments of audible savagery.  Yet this is George’s attempt to accept his wolf in order to save his best friend.  That’s why George and Josh begin their respective second series in completely different places.

This might be a good thing, since in the BBC version, George spends much of this season being kind of a dick and poor newly-turned Nina deals with most of her problems alone.  Will this happen for Josh?  Hard to say, but so far there are few similarities.

Both Nina and Nora keep having been scratched a secret until the first change.  However, Nina can see Annie, so she asks for help and swears her to secrecy.  I had hoped that Sally and Nora would have a similar bonding experience, which in my mind could have been done without allowing Nora to see her yet, but Sally continues to be solely immersed in her own ghostly realm.  While it seems likely that Josh will find out about Nora, depending on how he manages to escape being shot by the vampire, Nina continues to keep her secret until the truth comes out in an argument.  She has distanced herself sexually from George, which he interprets as her rejecting his wolf.  (This may still happen with Nora and Josh, since the series starts with her gently refusing him.)  Nina begs George for patience and support but he is overwhelmed with self-loathing and the new level of anger and violence that are the result of his having embraced his wolf in order to kill Herrick.  He is also on edge because vampires are constantly attacking him in retaliation for Herrick’s death.  This is obviously not part of Josh’s reality at this point, which may change the direction of the series.

BBC’s Being Human Season 1 ends with an introduction to the villain of the following series, and it has nothing to do with any vampire “Mother”.    I’ve said before that the Old Ones were only introduced on BBC in Season 3, and the finale suggested that there would be a conflict with them next season.  The villain for Season 2 is an old man who has apparently been searching for the trio, and found them with the help of mental patient and fiance-murderer, Owen.  We find out in Season 2 that he’s a religious man who views all non-humans as abominations.

The environment between the roommates is fertile for a villain to exploit.  Mitchell is overwhelmed with being the new vampire king; George attempts to separate himself further from his wolf and causes more problems with his denial; and Annie is threatened by the world beyond the door that she turned down and also begins to think about the implications of immortality as an unchanging ghost.  Given Sally’s nightmare about a reaper coming after her and Aidan’s problematic attempt to keep the vampires clean, some BBC plot lines will clearly prevail.  The future of Josh and Nora is much more unclear.  I do hope Nora will go through the same anger and angst and love that Nina went through as she struggled to accept her new role.

One thing is clear, Syfy has an advantage because they’re two seasons behind.  This gives them a chance to avoid the pitfalls that poor Toby Whithouse’s show has run into because three of the four main characters are leaving before the story is told.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, those are  more spoilers than I really want to put here—Google at your own risk.

Being Human: UK Season 3 Appearing in US Season 1? (SPOILERS)

So here I am, still watching, still complaining.  I’m not sure what’s going on with this version.  I’m up to date on this season in the UK, so imagine my astonishment to see some of the new season 3 plotlines appearing in the US’ season 1.  I find it confusing.  I’d love to know what new fans think of it, because maybe it’s a BBC-Fan-Personal-Problem.  See, the first season in the UK was all about the 3 roommates becoming close and relying on each other for safety, acceptance, and understanding.  The US version seems all over the place.  Storylines appear and disappear and a lot more characters have been introduced.  Some of the differences work, and some I just don’t like at all.  I’ll helpfully share just a few of each kind.

Last week’s Bernie episode went differently.  Presumably the writers didn’t feel that it was realistic to have Aidan confide in Bernie’s mother and turn Bernie himself,  leaving her with a vampire child (Mitchell’s move).  That’s okay; most vampire fans have read enough and seen enough to believe that vampire children never work out for the best. (Claudia from IwtV anyone?)  Instead Rebecca turns Bernie in the hopes of making a family with Aiden.  Not bad; it goes along with her struggle in her reluctant life as a vampire.  The only part that disturbed me was Bishop’s apparent sympathy for human children.  I’ll explain that later.

This week’s episode was where the new UK season has showed up a lot.  BBC has just introduced the concept of vampires hosting werewolf cage matches, so imagine my surprise when Josh gets kidnapped for this same purpose in Dog Eat Dog. The difference is that instead of tossing some poor human in to be slaughtered, the vamps pit two werewolves together.  In the UK version, Mitchell was not even aware that the cage matches still existed; it is supposed to be another example of the crueler side of things that Herrick hides from Mitchell in order to keep him from leaving.  That’s why it was hard for me to watch Aidan stand by looking chagrined at best, mostly just because his best friend happens to be involved.

The Elders that have been mentioned for the first time in the UK (whom we’ve yet to glimpse) have appeared here as Amish vampires who show up now and then to kill the vampire king.  Their presence keeps Aidan from being able to outwardly rescue Josh, so he makes a deal to return to Bishop in exchange for Josh’s release.  This takes the place of Mitchell deciding that vampirism is the answer to humanity’s problems after Bernie was killed, causing him to return to the fold.

If Aidan isn’t going to have this misguided epiphany, that could explain why I saw a very similar storyline to  Mitchell and his human love, Jonie, shockingly applied to Bishop.  Jonie is the one to help Mitchell see the error of his thinking, but now she isn’t necessary for Aidan.  Of course, the story changes quite a bit, since Bishop is offered his leadership in exchange for giving up (by choking her to death) his love.  This entire idea is a huge departure from Herrick, who has never had a moment that was not pure evil, unless you include his indulgence for Mitchell.    Herrick scares the crap out of me most of the time, just because he is capable of anything and really enjoys himself all the while.  Yet Bishop shows sympathy for human children, and seems as if he was once on the same journey as Aidan is now and was forced by the Elders and Aidan to give it up.  What gives?  How does this softness coincide with his plan to have vampires come out in the open and take over the world from humanity?  More importantly, does this mean they won’t be including the following vital scene?

Anyway, right next to that big softy is Aidan when he was still drinking the kool-aid, quoting party lines and living it up vampire style.  He’s the one convincing Bishop to renounce the human woman, threatening betrayal if he will not.  I could be wrong, but I don’t recall a single Mitchell-Herrick flashback where Herrick was not completely in charge.  Herrick has always been King, while it now seems that Bishop and Aidan were fellow peons once.  BTW, I didn’t really appreciate this added line about Aidan, while fighting the Revolutionary War,  leaving behind family, a wife and a son.  Sounds sooo familiar…True Blood’s Bill Compton minus the pretty southern accent?  Just about.  Trying to differentiate your story from its source by borrowing from another, more popular story seems like a mistake.  Maybe it’s just me.

Shocking to the point of horrifying, the trailer for next week’s episode shows Nora announcing that she’s pregnant, which causes nightmares for Josh.  Is this for real?  Nina is pregnant now, season 3, after they’ve been through so much and she’s actually a werewolf herself.  Why make Nora pregnant before she even finds out about Josh?  Season 1, they’ve just been getting closer together, and struggling to do so because of his gigantic, dangerous secret.  Sure, throw a baby in the mix.

I don’t know what the Syfy version intends with all this skipping ahead.  I do think my point of view is irrevocably biased in favor of BBC, so I can’t tell for sure if these changes are actual problems or not.  Maybe it’s better to give Bishop a softer side and knock Nora up straight out of the gate?  Maybe with more episodes in a season, events move faster?  I don’t know.  Maybe it doesn’t matter.  George owns “Who wants some of my chair?” anyway.